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Why You Should Care About the Wabtec Strike

Why You should Care About the Wabtec Strike

The first in a series of blogs about the Erie, Pennsylvania wage dispute.

If you are a blue-collar manufacturing worker in Erie, you should be concerned about the Wabtec/GE strike. The outcome of this labor dispute may eventually affect you.

Here’s how GE labor relations affected Erie in the past:

My Husband as an Example

Jeff worked as a journeyman toolmaker in Erie at a livable wage for years. When the owners of manufacturing companies in town banded together to control wages and, in some cases, alleviate overtime costs, Jeff’s pay raises and overtime stopped. We had three children in college at the time, so Jeff applied to and accepted a job at GE as a second-shift, press-brake operator in the hope overtime would be available to help pay our mounting college costs.

That year, GE hired hundreds of Erie workers. Smaller Erie manufacturers lost much of their skilled labor to them. In an attempt to keep some employees, those Erie manufacturing companies had to step up their pay increases and benefits. In doing so, they kept some employees from going to GE.

Fast forward a few years. GE is no longer hiring. In fact, they have laid some of those workers off.

Now those same manufacturers have the ability to fall back to their nickel-and-diming ways. So, some did. No need to take the scaling back to prior ways personal. This is Basic Supply and Demand 101.

Webster defines supply and demand as: the amount of goods and services that are available for people to buy compared to the amount of goods and services that people want to buy. If less of a product (workers) than the public (manufacturers) wants is produced, the law of supply and demand says that more can be charged (paid to) for the product (workers).

Hence, if GE attracts more Erie workers by paying them more, there are less workers available to other Erie manufactures and, in essence, they must pay those of you out there not working for GE more.

GE/Wabtec Rates

If the new Wabtec lowers labor rates, employers in our area will follow. Period.

You can debate this issue at length, but if your employer no longer worries about losing you to Wabtec, fight all you want for that cost-of-living wage hike, their backs are no longer against the wall.

Yes, you may have a few great employers who do right by their employees, but manufacturing businesses are currently in the struggle of their lives. If their employees don’t have better employment opportunities in our area, Erie manufacturers no longer have to work as hard to keep them.

Our Area

Here’s a complaint I have about the Erie area.

I worked in Economic and Community Development for years before I retired. An Economic Development leader once complained that GE blue-collar workers were earning six figures. It was a nice spring morning in May, and I asked him how many days he had taken off that year. He said he had only used a few vacation days.

“No, how many days away from the office have you had? Saturdays and Sundays included?”

Well, of course, he may have worked some overtime, but he generally had weekends off.

“My husband has only had three days off in over four months—weekends included. That is the reason he will make six figures this year.”

Economic Development Leaders want a community college? Of course, they do. (Remember the properties of supply and demand?) They want to attract jobs to the Erie area? Of course. And in order to do so Erie needs more skilled labor?

Here’s a tip: stop bashing the skilled workers you do have.

 

Tomorrow: Mandatory Overtime

Email your comments to Cyndie.zahner@gmail.com

 

_____________________________________________    Cyndie Zahner has lived in the Erie community her entire life. She is a retired grant writer/administrator, and now writes fiction novels. Follow her on InstagramTwitterFacebookGoodreadsBookBubLinkedIn and purchase her books on Amazon. See her BookCircle Online interview at here.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/cyndiezahner/

https://www.facebook.com/cyndie.zahner

https://twitter.com/TweetyZ

Dream Wide Awake Book Club Questions

  1. What character in this book would you most like to meet and why?
  2. Which Callahan sister could you identify with more?
  3. Did Rachel Callahan surprise you?
  4. Of all the characters, whose likeability factor changed the most? (Whether you thought they were good-hearted in the beginning but disliked them in the end, or feared them at the start but grew to like them.)
  5. Who, at one time or another during your read, did you feel could be the kidnapper?
  6. Do you believe some people are clairvoyant?
  7. Have you yourself ever experienced a premonition or seen a ghost?
  8. If you had to send one person, from your book club, to participate in an Area 51 secret government program, who do you feel would handle the situation best?
  9. If you have not read the prequel, Project Dream, what do you believe the children experienced in that Nevada desert?
  10. If Lisa Callahan had gone to the desert instead of Rachel, how much would the story have changed? Would she have used drugs?
  11. Do you feel Jack’s decision to protect Mikala on his own was warranted? Wise?
  12. If your child was clairvoyant, would you tell anyone?
  13. What do you think Mikala Daly is going to be like when she grows up?
  14. Do you believe the United States government would ever design a child prodigy program for the good of the country?
  15. If you had the chance to ask the author one question, what would you ask?

Feel free to email other questions to cyndie@cyndiezahner.com. Thanks for reading!

_________________________________________                 Cyndie Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene and Dream Wide Awake. Listen to her BookCircle Online interview about how her 9/11 premonition influenced her writing of the novel Dream Wide Awake  here, follow her on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, BookBub, LinkedIn, purchase her books on Amazon, or sign up for here semi-annual newsletter here.

Make an Author Happy! Write a Review!

What do authors want? Reviews, reviews and more reviews.  So, a note like this? Much appreciated and a great confidence builder but please, consider posting those kind words.

Readers have no idea how much posting a review online matters. We authors are a mere molecule in a bucket of a million. There are lots of readers out there but many won’t consider reading a book until fifty reviews pop up under the title. Worse, Amazon, Goodreads, and the like won’t give your book a second look.

So, have a favorite author? Write a review for him or her on Amazon, Goodreads, BookBub or other popular review sites and help them connect with other readers. If that doesn’t encourage you to post a review, here’s another reason: Authors appreciate every word, and most take your views into consideration as they write more stories.

Oh, and another thing,  I’m an author and NONE of us expect all five-star reviews.stars (Well, there may be a narcissist or two out there but most of us realize we aren’t the next Stephen King.) I’m almost afraid to say this, but truth be told, I’ve learned as much about my writing from three-star reviews as five-stars. Authors are thick skinned. Tell us the truth. Couple a compliment with your critique, and we will love your review.

Compliments are important because a novel is a big part of an author’s life (months, years sometimes). Characters are their children. Authors like to hear what you enjoyed about their lives and kids.

Equally, we want to know what you didn’t like. I learned so much from my first readers. Bill Callahan, a friend of mine, suggested in both my novels, The Suicide Gene and Dream Wide Awake, that I create character/family charts. So, I did, for both. Because I like to challenge my readers to think, my novels can be confusing in the early pages. Readers are loving the character keys. Thanks, Bill!

So, please, if you find an author you particularly like, write a review and make them happy. I promise we will read every review, multiple times. We listen. We appreciate. We learn.

How to review on Major Sites

Amazon: if you have purchased the book make sure you post a VERIFIED review. This is important because Amazon sometimes removes reviews but almost never removes reviews posted by verified users.

  • go to your Amazon account
  • select “orders” in the black ribbon toward the top (next to account), if you purchased through Amazon, otherwise enter the book title in the search box,
  • scroll down to the book and on the right side click the “write a product review” box,
  • click a star (1-5 stars)
  • add a headline (page-turner, couldn’t put down, must read, etc.)
  • write a review!

(Give a description. See suggestions below. Amazon is less likely to remove more detailed reviews. If you received the novel free for a review, write: Thank you to the author/publisher for providing a free copy for an honest review. This review is posted voluntarily.)

Goodreads:  create an account and review as follows:

  • Enter book title in search box (or web address, mine is http://bit.ly/CZDWAg)
  • Click dropdown box (arrow) under cover picture on left side
  • Select read
  • Click number of stars for My Rating:
  • Copy and paste your Amazon review into the ‘What did you think?” box or write a review from scratch.

(If you do not see a review box, hover over “read” and “write a review” will appear.)

BookBub: is the simplest. Create an account, then:

  • Enter book title in search box,
  • Click on book when it appears below box
  • Click review
  • Select stars
  • Check I recommend if you’d like to recommend this book to others
  • Write a review
  • Click share

(For Barnes & Noble, Rifflebooks, or Kobo see my book club article here.)

Samples of What to Write in Your Review

What was the story about? Ex.: Dream Wide Awake is a thriller based in Erie PA….This thriller, based in a small city,…the storyline is about seers…Mikala Daly was born into a family of seers…Detective Jack Daly attempts to keep his daughter’s dreams secret in this psychic thriller.

Who was your favorite/least favorite character and why?: I liked Mikala Daly…I wasn ‘t fond of Billy’s sarcasm…minor character Andy Mesmer was one of my favorites…I hope to learn more about the chief in a sequel…I wasn’t fond of Lenny…

Did you like/dislike the plot? I enjoy a book with a lot of twists and turns…the plot kept me thinking…I hope a sequel resolves a question I had…

You get the idea, here are some other questions:

  • Were characters credible?
  • Could you relate to a character?
  • Was the story believable? Possible?
  • Have you experienced anything similar?
  • Did you like the book?
  • What was your favorite and/or least favorite part?
  • If you could change something, what would it be?
  • Would you recommend this book?
  • What type of person would like this book?
  • Would you like to read a prequel, sequel, or other books by this author?

How to Review CJ Zahner’s Novels

If you’ve read mine, I’d love to see your review on any of the following sites. Click on the name of the site under the book you’ve read and you’l be redirected to my page on that site!

Dream Wide Awakewrite a review
Amazon
Goodreads
BookBub
Barnes and Noble
Rifflebooks
KOBO

The Suicide Gene
Amazon
Goodreads
BookBub
The Wild Rose Press
Barnes and Noble
KOBO
Riffle

Read and review on!

_________________________________________                 Cyndie Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene and Dream Wide Awake., Listen to her BookCircle Online interview how her 9/11 premonition influenced her writing here, follow her on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, BookBub, LinkedIn, purchase her books on Amazon, or sign up for here semi-annual newsletter here.

What does your Fridge say About you?

Refridgerators talk. What does mine say?

Mine says I love family, girlfriends, writing, and running. My hubby is a huge sports fanatic. My kids are, too. I’m a writer. My husband works at GE. We’ve both run marathons. We have three children who are also sports nuts. My oldest daughter worked for the Orioles at one time. And the Rams. We hike a lot with friends. Especially enjoy adventures out west where the Kokopelli roam. I love chocolate. And wine. Jeff’s hero is Ted Williams. We’ve had some health issues. May need anger management. I forget more these days. But I remember I want to go to Paris. And the height of our being, the apex of our existence, lies in our sweet, beautiful granddaughter, Layla Grace.

Post yours! See what you learn about yourself.

Or send me a pic and I’ll take a gander.

Some people did and here they are:

leann's refridgeratorLeAnne…This is a GOLD MINE! You’re totally a people person with all those pics. You have too much to do because your calendar is HUGE. You try to appear organized (envelope at the bottom) but you’re not (stuffed with papers). You are a kid at heart (seahorse), competititve (flags, triathlon sticker), you like Penn State and the Steelers, either visited or want to visit Paris (I didn’t want to cheat, I know you’ve been there.) And you shop on the internet alot (shoe, purse, book icons on envelope). Oh and you can be sneaky and tend to ignore things you don’t want to think about (bottom—what the heck are those items you hid there. A lock?)

 

heahter's refridgeratorHeather…this girl is no bullshit. She’s organized, definitely not materialistic (there is nothing there!). She is organized to a fault (who has two calendars on their fridge?) and she has contrasting qualities–she can be hard and business like (square, formal, typed calendar) and soft and kind (handwritten, personal calendar). Everyone wants this girl for friend.

 

Read on!

_________________________________________                Cyndie Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene, a psychological thriller, and Dream Wide Awake, a paranormal novel that is totally fiction, but has been inspired by her own experiences. Listen to her premonitions of 9/11 here, and  follow her on InstagramTwitter, Facebook, Goodreads, BookBub, LinkedIn and purchase her books on Amazon.

House Rules by Jodi Picoult

Name:                 House Rules

Author:               Jodi Picoult

Rating:                3.5

General Rating:

This is my least favorite Jodi Picoult novel. Usually, I love her entire book, but House Rules is a slow start. I did not like the beginning, yet once I was into the middle there were times I could not put it down. I found myself laughing at Jacob’s take on life or words at times. (I would have enjoyed more of that.) I estimate a little over 50% of this book is page turning. I did not like the end at all. Hence my lower score.

Skip factor:

Despite this being my least favorite Picoult novel, skipping was minimal. I only skipped long speeches by attorneys toward the end and a few of Jacob’s involved descriptions.

Who should read?

Voracious readers will find this an easy read once they reach page fifty or there about. Readers who like action may not make it that far. Picky readers may not like. I believe people interested in Aspergers or Autism will enjoy. People with children who have those challenges? I’m not sure they will like. I have a friend, Rochelle, with two son’s. One has autism. Although she is a voracious reader, I advised her to skip this Picoult novel.

Summary:          This is the story of Jacob Hunt, a child with Asperger’s syndrome and the accompanying challenges for Jacob, his mother, Emma, and brother, Theo. The story is told from several character’s perspectives. Voices change with chapters. (Fonts change, too, which helps remind you a new character is speaking.) The people include:

Emma, the mother of an autistic son, also writes a parental column for a newspaper from home. Her entire life revolves around her autistic son. Jacob. She is divorced.

Jacob, relays his thoughts in an interesting way. At times he is comical, very smart, and other times you get lost in his logic. The author has done a great job helping readers see life from behind this challenging disability.

Theo is Jacob’s younger brother and is often caught between loving his brother and hating his brother’s Aspergers, and how his own life has been affected.

Oliver is the attorney thrust into the family situation.

Police Officers but to be completely honest, I wasn’t  sure these were needed. I never really understood why they were included.

Characters:         Picoult did okay with character development. Each character carries his or her own distinct voice. However, I did have a hard time connecting or loving any one individual person, and I never quite understood the purpose of the supporting characters (police officers/detectives.) Yet, dialogue between characters was good and they definitely had emotional depth.

Storyline:           The start fell short. The story had a good hook and was believable. The main conflict kept me turning pages, but at the risk of revealing too much, I’ll refrain from talking about resolving conflicts. Each of the main characters had purpose and goals, however here again, the minor characters fell short.

Writing style:    Simply, I love Picoult’s writing style. Narrative and dialogue was well balanced. Style exquisite. Voice great. Her writing flows well.

Read on!

_________________________________________                 Cyndie Zahner is the author of Dream Wide Awake, a paranormal novel that is totally fiction, but has been inspired by her own experiences. This is the first in a series of blogs about her inspiration behind the novel. Follow her on InstagramTwitterFacebookGoodreadsBookBubLinkedIn and purchase her books on Amazon.

Support Erie & Have a Merry Read!

Need a last minute gift under $20? $15? How about under $4. Support your Erie Community. Stop at a local book store! Like Pressed Books.

Of course, I’d love you to buy my novels, but if you aren’t into thrillers, check out other Erie authors that Pressed flaunts. And bring your kids. They have a lovely reading area for children.

The last time I stepped into Pressed’s checkout line, three little girls and their mother were queued up in front of me. Each of the girls had their own money and paid for the books they purchased individually. The checkout was a slow process. Stepping up to a Pressed Bookscounter that towers over you alone took some time, not to mention counting dollar bills out, and change, too!

Annoyed? No way. I loved watching.

There is something about a book in hand in a child that sends a chill through me. The girls were excited for their purchase and so was I. So much so, that if any grandparents have grandchildren they need a last minute item for, I suggest they buy a big box and put a gift card to a local bookstore inside. Then take them after Christmas. Trust me–this gift is more for you than them.Pressed for kids.JPEG

And while you’re picking up those gift cards, can I interest you in The Suicide Gene under $20, Dream Wide Awake, under $15? (If you are more a kindle reader, they are available on Amazon at here  for under $3 & $6). Another author’s book?Or you may take a few moments to relax during the busy season for a great cup of coffee at Pressed, stop in at Pop Luck for some popcorn, or run over to Romolo’s for a shot of caffeine to keep you going.

Have yourself a Merry Read this Christmas!

_________________________________________                            Cyndie Zahner is the author of Dream Wide Awake, a paranormal novel that is totally fiction, but has been inspired by her own experiences. This is the first in a series of blogs about her inspiration behind the novel. Follow her on InstagramTwitterFacebookGoodreadsBookBubLinkedIn and purchase her books on Amazon.

 

 

 

My 9/11 Premonition

Do my premonitions scare you? How would you like to be me? You can get away from me. I can’t.

When I was three years old, I had a paranormal experience with a black devil. (This is the basis for Chapter Three in my novel, Dream Wide Awake.) When I was thirteen, I thought bad spirits were going to infuse their ectoplasm into me and take over my body. For years I couldn’t walk into a funeral home without shaking because I felt like the person in the casket was, somehow, still in the room.

And when I turned thirty? I said, “Well, if mental illness hasn’t surfaced in me by now, it never will.”

These are some of the events in my life that led to my belief in the paranormal, which Dream Wide Awake Cover 2500inadvertently led to my Novel, Dream Wide Awake. (Read an excerpt and/or purchase on Amazon.)  But truthfully, I’m an extremely logical person. So, from a young age, I thought something was terribly wrong with my brain. I could feel spirits, ghosts, energy, whatever you’d like to call the phenomenon, but because I could not see anything with my eyes, logically, I concluded I had a wild imagination.

Learning the secret

I learned the secret early on: don’t talk about the wild imagination.

When I was thirteen years old, I scared the daylight out of my cousin, Jane, while we babysat. I walked into a house and felt like something or some spirit would overtake my soul. I told my cousin I was afraid I was going to turn into someone else. (I know you remember this, Jane. Believe me, I was frightened, too.)

Shortly thereafter, my mother told me I had to stop talking about “this thing,” or I was going to end up in a mental ward. So, I did. I stopped talking about it for thirty years.

Ignoring the movies

There is no way to make this sound sane. I had to force myself to ignore the movies in my head: A bank teller’s grandmother standing behind her waving her arms. Ignore. My friend’s mother hovering over her at the hospital church mass. Look away. The spirit floating above the gravestone. Leave. The military guy lingering behind a mother who innocently came to my front door to sign her child up for soccer. Don’t tell her.

I remember when that soccer mom left, I leaned my back against the door, slid to the floor, and cried, saying, “I’m crazy.”

But I wasn’t crazy.

The premonition that changed my thinking

I’m not sure why I had the 9/11 premonition. I was never able to see the vision clearly enough to gather what exactly would happen. And even if I had, what would I have done? The only thing I know is if I hadn’t had the vision of being inside one of those World Trade Center buildings when they began to fall, I might still to this day think I was crazy.

The vision began two months before the tragedy. The first time I recorded anything, I wrote notes in the July 11th box of my desk calendar.

In the first half of this “movie in my head,” I floated toward a city. I realized, months later, I was seeing this from a plane’s view. I was in Northeastern America floating above pine trees and approaching water. I thought I was near a Great Lake in upper-state New York. I mistakenly wrote Huron for Lake Ontario, because I am geographically challenged.

I also wrote tall building and sm city for small city. Later I crossed out small and wrote med for medium. Later still, I put a question mark after med, because with each vision, I came closer to the city and saw its size. I wrote 27 F for the 27th floor, but I remember July 2001 Calandar - 11th boxthinking, no, 72nd floor. (I never wrote that down.)

In the second half of this vision, I was at my desk, working, and the building began to move. The first time I had the vision, I thought an earthquake rocked City Hall. The room swayed. I glanced down and saw huge gray floor boulders buckling beneath me. The entire building was collapsing.

That was it. I had this vision three days in a row, and then weekly once or twice for the next two months. I was always at my desk at work, and it was always morning. I wrote before noon, 10:14, and 10:16, but never wrote any more times because I always experienced this vision between 10 and 10:30.

Keeping the calendar

At the end of July, I told myself I would keep the calendar one more month. I was sure a building would collapse.

At the end of August, I attended a training in Washington DC in a building about one mile from the pentagon. The class was in the basement and the entire time I thought, “I hope this isn’t the building that’s going to collapse, because if it is, I’m dead.”

July 2001 Calendar
July 2001 Calendar

On September 1, I couldn’t throw the calendar away. I said if a building didn’t collapse by September, 30th, I’d toss it then. (That calendar is pictured in the cover of this article.)

On 9/11

On the morning of 9/11, a co-worker mentioned two planes had hit the World Trade Center. Our director moved his television into our office reception area, so people could watch throughout the morning.

Around 10 am, a coworker walked by my cubicle, announcing one of the buildings had collapsed. I asked if people had still been inside and he said yes. I was mortified. I returned to my desk, thinking about those people. Then I realized—I was sitting in the exact place where I’d had those premonitions.

I went out to the reception area where people had gathered to watch, and said, “I know you guys are going to think I’m crazy, but I’ve had this premonition of a building collapsing for two months. What time did this happen?” Someone said it began at 8:30 and I said that made me feel a bit better, because I always had the vision of the building falling between 10 and 10:30. That’s when our secretary, Sharon, said the building collapsed at 10.

I was so upset, I rushed to the ladies’ room and splashed water on my face. By the time I returned, the second building had collapsed.

Sharon asked if I was all right, and I said she must think I was crazy. Then I remembered my notes. Frantically, I pushed my work aside and exposed the desk calendar, still flaunting July. I showed her and she said nothing.

“I know. My notes don’t really do justice to what I saw,” I said.

“Oh, I believe you,” she replied. “Look where you kept your notes.”

All of the notes I took were inside the box marked 11.

Other premonitions

I’ve had other movies in my head—crazy movies. But I’ll leave those for another day.

For now, I’ll just say that since 9/11, I pay attention to the things I see. I don’t believe in coincidences and so I’m sure that 2001 vision served some purpose. I’m not completely sure what that was. The vision didn’t seem to help anyone—except maybe me.

I no longer believe I’m crazy

___________________________________________

Cyndie Zahner is the author of Dream Wide Awake, a paranormal novel that is totally fiction, but has been inspired by her own experiences. This is the first in a series of blogs about her inspiration behind the novel. Follow her on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, BookBub, LinkedIn and purchase her books on Amazon.

My Inspiration for Dream Wide Awake

Dream Wide Awake was inspired many years ago on a night I met fright. I was sleeping in the attic of my grandparent’s home—just like LeeLee in chapter three.

In a pitch-black hour, I awoke when someone grabbed my hand. My arm was wedged between the head board and mattress of my bed. I felt someone’s fingers slip into mine and when I opened my eyes, he didn’t let go.

I say “he” because I was sure I clasped hands with a devil. I didn’t see him, but could feel him with every inch of my three-year-old being. I screamed and my mother came and lifted me into her arms, pulling me from his grip. She said I was dreaming, but I knew better.

Fast forward fifty years. This single incident, still so alive in my memory, inspired Dream Wide Awake. The story is fiction, but the setting in chapter three is my grandparent’s attic. My own grandmother was bedridden as in the novel, my mother did have to help nurse her, and my parents, brother, and I moved into a makeshift apartment in her attic.

How impacting was that single incident of feeling someone’s grip in the night? Well, one, I have never once slept with a hand dangling over the side of the bed since, and two, it inspired a novel.

The novel

Dream Wide Awake is a paranormal thriller about a family of seers. And at the risk of having some people think I’m crazy and others ask what their future holds, I’ll admit I have had an occasional premonition. My most substantial one being a vague forewarning of 9/11.

For two months before the twin towers fell, I had visions that I was approaching a northeastern American city, near water, from a plane’s eye view. The image came (and there is no sane way to describe this) as a movie in my head. First, I was in the sky moving, and next, I was in a building and the gray floor boulders were buckling beneath me. The building was collapsing.

I kept notes of this vision on my big July desk calendar. Wouldn’t throw it out at the end of July or August because I was sure a building was going to fall. On September 11th when the first building collapsed, I dug my calendar out from under a myriad of paperwork, and there were my notes. All contained in the big box of the 11th of the month. I nearly passed out.

Hence my belief: premonitions can be real. Do I believe in psychics and mediums, too? Yes, to varying degrees.

As a freelance writer I once interviewed a true medium, Anne Gehman. Gehman participated alongside four other mediums in a University of Arizona professor’s afterlife experiments. (The Afterlife Experiments, Breakthrough Scientific Evidence of life After Death, by Gary E. Schwartz, Ph.D. with William. L. Simon.) She said clairvoyance was like playing the piano. Some people sat down and played naturally. Others, no matter how long they trained on the keys, would never make great pianists. But some who practiced long and hard? Did became proficient.

This made me wonder. Could children be trained to be psychic?

The notion

In Dream Wide Awake, three boys have been abducted in a small town. Mikala Daly, a six-year-old girl from a normal American family, is having visions of those boys, but her parents must hide her sixth-sense abilities because of a governmental program called Project Dream.

The backstory is that after 9/11, the CIA initiated an innovative national security test program. Twenty-five children were removed from reformatory facilities across the country and placed in Project Dream. The program’s purpose was to augment the adult remote-viewing program. Scientists believed children might be more easily trained and more successful in identifying threats to the American people and government through remote viewing.

When the project produces stunning results, they “recruit” seventy-five more children. Good kids without juvenile records. Children selected had two main characteristics: a sixth sense and physical superiority.

Mikala Daly’s aunt Rachel was one of the original Project Dream kids, and now no one in Mikala’s family will divulge Mikala’s gifts for fear the government will take her away to Project Dream, too. Unbelievable? (Let me remind you of the immigration debacle.)

This story is fiction, not a premonition—I think…

Author Links:

Author website www.cjzahner.com
Dream Wide Awake by CJ Zahner, Amazon http://bit.ly/AMDWACZ
Dream Wide Awake by CJ Zahner, Barnes & Noble http://bit.ly/BNDWA
Dream Wide Awake by CJ Zahner /, Kobo http://bit.ly/CZDWAk
The Suicide Gene by CJ Zahner, Amazon http://bit.ly/AMSGene
Follow CJ on goodreads at http://bit.ly/gCJZahner
Follow CJ on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/cjzahner/?hl=en
Follow CJ on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/authorcjzahner/
Follow CJ on Twitter at https://twitter.com/TweetyZ

Excerpt from Dream Wide Awake, Chapter 1, Jack:

She was quiet, still, her expression soft. Lip relaxed against lip. Then her eyes opened.
“He can see me.”
At first, because of her casualness, he thought he’d surely heard her wrong. “Who can see you?”
“The bad man.”
His calmness faded to confusion. He tightened his eyebrows. Premonitions, they called these episodes. His wife experienced them, now his daughter. But they were never interactive.
“What do you mean he can see you?”
“He said my name. He has a guide.”
“A guide?”
“You know, Daddy, someone who shows him movies. He knows who I am.”
“No, Mikala, the bad man does not know who you are.”
“Yes, he does, Daddy.” For the first time, he heard panic in her voice. “That’s the reason he is at Danny’s house.”
A creak in the floor behind him grabbed his attention, and he turned his head. Lisa darted from the bedroom, ripped Mikala from his arms, and handed him something in her place.
“I told you not to allow this. I said you were playing with fire.”
“Lisa, she’s wrong. He can’t see her.”
“Yes, he can, Daddy.”
“No, he can’t, Mikala.” He lowered his voice to sound stern.
“Yes—yes he can. He’s with Danny right now. Run Daddy. Get Danny!”
“Go.” Lisa screamed so loud one of the boys in the next room woke crying.
Jack looked down at his lap—at the ratty sneakers Lisa had placed there. For the moment it took him to put them on, he wondered if he should run or drive the block and a half to his sister’s house. He decided, descended the stairs, and bounded out the front door bare-chested, leaving Lisa behind switching on lights and talking into the scanner. She would call for a cruiser to go to Janice’s house, to her own house. But Mikala was wrong about Danny. She had to be. He was going to be in a heap of trouble with the chief later.
He ran down the driveway and disappeared into the black night within seconds. His legs turned over like an Olympic sprinter’s, his breath labored, and sweat beaded on his upper lip. He rounded Third Street and nearly slipped in the wet grass on Nevada Drive but caught himself. He saw her house in the distance. Janice, four months separated from her husband, was alone there with her son. Alone like the others. Three single mothers of three abducted little boys.
His mind raced. The police would be at his house in two minutes. At Janice’s in three. They protected each other’s families.
When he was four houses away, he began screaming his sister’s name. Trying to scare anyone off. Make the bad man drop the child? Leave without the child? He didn’t know why he screamed. By the time his feet hit her driveway her light had turned on. The front bedroom window opened.
“Jack?” Janice’s voice slithered through the screen.
He passed her window and ran toward the back of the house, toward Danny’s room. He could see broken glass on the ground shimmering with the reflection of a street light. Dear God, no, he thought. It couldn’t be. These abductions could not have hit his family.
“Danny,” he yelled.
When he reached his nephew’s window, the whites of Danny’s two little eyes glowed in the dark room. He was there. Standing. Looking out the bare, open window back at him. Waiting.
“Hi, Uncle Jack,” Danny said, his little face peeking over the window ledge, his stuffed bear, Tony, nudged under his chin.
Jack leaned hands on house and huffed, trying to catch his breath. Trying to decipher Danny was okay. Alive. Mikala was wrong.
“Thank God, thank God,” he uttered out loud. When he caught his breath, he gazed up at his nephew.
That’s when horror seized him. Above Danny’s little face, secured on the broken glass, a scribbling on Christian stationary paralyzed him. It was the abductor’s fourth message, but the first to make Jack’s blood circulate like an electrical current. The words he read flowed over his lips in a whisper, expelled with terrifying breath.
“One mulligan for Mikala.”
______________________________________

Cyndie “CJ” Zahner is an author of The Suicide Gene and Dream Wide Awake. She is also, very much, a dreamer. Follower Zahner at http://www.cjzahner.com, Amazon, Facebook, Instagram, twitter, goodreads, and Bookbub.

One for the Book Clubs

Ever get to the end of a book and say, “W-what?” Well, rest assured, if you select  Dream Wide Awake or The Suicide Gene for your book club, I’ll answer all those questions that leave you wrinkling your nose and scratching your head.

Book Clubs should email their questions to me.

Email me at cyndie@cyndiezahner.com with the subject line “Book Club ?s.” I’ll respond.

And pay attention while you turn those pages. I love a good Easter egg hunt. Read closely and you’ll find a hint in the beginning of Dream Wide Awake about who the perpetrator is. Give the ending of The Suicide Gene your total attention, and you’ll know just how smart M. McKinney was.

And please, please, please, leave me a review.

Reviews are more important than you know!

Especially for new authors. I will be indebted to anyone who leaves a review. Amazon won’t consider me a serious writer until I’ve gotten 50. Here are the websites (Look for DWA in address for Dream Wide Awake and SGene for The Suicide Gene):

Amazon http://bit.ly/AMDWACZ and http://bit.ly/AMSGene
– Click on one of the stars 1-5
–  click customer reviews next to stars and/or “write Review”
– add a headline (what is the most important thing to know)
– Copy and paste your review

Goodreads http://bit.ly/CZDWAg and http://bit.ly/gSGene
– Click dropdown box (arrow) under Cover picture
– As you hover over “read” options appear, select “write a review,”
– A review box appears
– Give a star rating, copy your review to the “what did you think box,” (all else optional),
– click save.
(Click on my name and “follow author” to make me really happy!)

Bookbub http://bit.ly/CZDWAbb and http://bit.ly/BBSgene
– if you don’t have an account it will prompt you to create one
– Click review box on the right
– Give book 1-5 stars
– Click as many traits as you think describe the book
– Copy in your review
– Click share
(Click on my name and follow me to make me really happy!)

Barnes & Noble http://bit.ly/BNDWA and http://bit.ly/BandNSGene
-scroll down page past “customer reviews” and select “write a review”
-It will prompt you to sign in
-click stars
-copy in your review

Rifflebooks http://bit.ly/CZDWAr and http://bit.ly/RfSGene
– click star rating on right of cover and check box to show read and heart to recommend
– click “add review” below the cover”
– click “post”

Kobo http://bit.ly/CZDWAk and http://bit.ly/KbSGene
– Scroll down to review section and click on red “write your review” button
– It will prompt you to sign in
– Add star rating
– Copy in review
– Add title for review
– Add your name

Thank you and read on!

________________________________________Cyndie “CJ” Zahner is an author of The Suicide Gene and Dream Wide Awake. She is also, very much, a dreamer. Follower Zahner at  www.cjzahner.comAmazonFacebookInstagramtwittergoodreads and Bookbub.

Dreamcycle, A Sonnet

Of life and dreams, a simple child is born.

His days pass by abound in rapt, and road

That lead to gain and loss, sweet bliss, and mourn.

‘Til night draws close, and eager step is slowed.

So, too, the dream is slowly whittled down.

From heights and mounts to plain and graded ground,

Where hues held fast do, sadly, fade to brown

And faith and hope grow dim and, then, profound.

Yet, dreams n’er die while beat the heart of man.

Before death rears its head and dreams defile,

Man turns his hope to tiny heart and hand,

And waning dreams live on in dreamer’s child.

Count years or wealth or friends or great esteem,

What keeps the soul of man alive–is dream.

________________________________________Cyndie “CJ” Zahner is an author of The Suicide Gene and Dream Wide Awake. She is also, very much, a dreamer. Follower Zahner at  www.cjzahner.comAmazonFacebookInstagramtwittergoodreads and Bookbub.