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Book Club Questions for Friends Who Move Couches

Select your favorites or answer all. The author’s favorites are 4, 8, 9, 13, & 14.

  1. Do you believe women need friends more than men?
  2. Which character in the book would you like to have as a friend?
  3. Are Nikki’s children typical kids and did you have a favorite?
  4. If you could toilet paper one person’s house in the whole world, whose would it be?
  5. Do you have a Rock-of-Gibraltar Jody in your life?
  6. How about a fun-loving Val?
  7. Which of the characters are you the most like?
  8. Where in the book, if ever, did you wish Nikki would notice Blake the Pro?
  9. Who was the best friend in the book?
  10. What is the most embarrassing thing that’s ever happened to you?
  11. Have you ever toilet papered a house? (Truth, please.)
  12. What one question would you like to ask the author? 
  13. The author unexpectedly fell in love with one character. Who do you think it was?
  14. Do you believe friends move into and out of our lives at precisely the right moment?
  15. If you had a nickname like Blake the Pro or TP Nikki or Doctor Death, what would it be?

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CJ Zahner is the author of a psychological thriller, The Suicide Gene, two thrillers with paranormal edges, Dream Wide Awake  & Project Dream, and ChickLit, Friends Who Move Couches, Chicklit. Book clubs may contact her at cyndie@cyndiezahner.com to set up in-person or Zoom meetings.

Searching for other author’s books? Read Zahner’s reviews here.

Follow CJ on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, BookBub, or LinkedIn. Purchase her books on Amazon.

A Grand Old Time by Judy Leigh

Rating:                              4

General Rating: A cute little story about old age. The main character, Evy, captured my heart immediately. It took a bit longer for me to warm up to the storyline, but I was in love with Evy so gladly kept going. By the second half of the book, I loved the story, too.

Skip factor:  5% I skipped parts in the first half and not a word in the second half.

Who should read:  Older women, but be warned, remember this is fiction. Following in Evy’s footsteps could be disastrous.

Summary:  If you’ve ever thought hard about future days in an assisted-living facility or nursing home, read this. After Evie’s husband passes away, she goes to live at Sheldon Lodge. She has one child, Brendan, whom she adores, but when she decides she no longer wants to live at the Lodge, she doesn’t bother Brendan and his wife. She embarks on a journey of her own.

Without a spoiler, the plot is not completely believable but so cute you keep reading. Evy’s lucky number is four, so when she decides to leave Sheldon Lodge, she finds herself at a race track betting on her lucky number four. She wins a very large amount of money and takes herself on an adventure.

Characters:  Leigh’s main character, Evy, grabs your heart from the start. Her other characters take some warming up to. Here they are in the order I liked them:

Evy is a quirky little old lady with a wild imagination. You can’t help but like her. Simply, she lies for fun, inspiring readers to wonder what she’ll do next. That anticipation keeps you reading.

Jean-Luc – I loved this character, maybe as much as Evy. Jean-Luc is the man Evy eventually falls in love with. He is introduced as a grumpy old man at a bar, but Leigh’s writing cleverly makes you take note of, even like, him immediately. Leigh hints he is cranky for some unknown reason, and readers fall in love with him along with Evy.

Maura is Brendan’s wife. She enters as a nagging minor character but in the latter half of the book, Maura emerges as a kind soul. Evy, who never cared for Maura, begins to see this better side of her, too. I went from not liking her at all to loving her in the second half of the book.

Brendan, the son, I didn’t like at all. He’s a negative person who never expresses himself. I do think Leigh conveys to her readers what it is like to be an introvert. I kept thinking, “Speak up Brendan,” but he barely does. He changes for the better, but not until much later.

Minor Characters abound during Evy’s travels. When she finally settles down, some advance to the forefront. I liked most of them, but none impressed me as much as the main characters. They flitted in and out for the purpose of helping readers grow to love Evy even more, which worked.

Storyline:  A cute story of a little old lady who refuses to sit idle in her senior years. She sets out on an adventure and finds love and happiness. The story is fun and simple, but it has underlying life messages including: live for the moment so you have no regrets in your old age, and life is not always as it seems. Evy’s perspective on life has changed over the years. What once seemed important to her, no longer is. A great lesson.

Writing:  Leigh’s simplistic writing draws you in easily. It’s a clever slow burn rather than page-turning. I wasn’t compelled to read long into the night. YET. I found myself reaching to read more of Evy’s adventures early in the morning, to find out what she was up to. Her writing is clean, crisp, and clever.

Once again as I’ve done in many books, I struggled a bit toward the beginning, but its slow start was purposeful. A reviewer of one of my own novels put first-chapter struggles better than me. She said: It took me a little bit to get into it, but I later realized the beginning of the book created the love for all the “friends who move bodies”.

Read this author again? Yes. I’m looking to read many more of Leigh’s novels. If you have one you liked in particular, shoot me an email!  

Read on!

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CJ Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene, a psychological thriller, Dream Wide Awake, and Project Dream, two thrillers that carry a sixth-sense paranormal element, and Friends Who Move Couches, women’s fiction. These last two novels were inspired by Zahner’s own experiences. See the video of her own paranormal experience, a premonition of 9/11 here. Download her Beyond Reality Radio podcast here. Follow her on InstagramTwitterFacebookGoodreadsBookBub, or LinkedIn. Purchase her books on Amazon.

 

 

Sorry I Missed You by Suzy Krause

Rating:                              4

General Rating: Do you like quirky? Read this. For the first fourth of Sorry I Missed You, I didn’t understand what the fuss over this book was. I mean it’s everywhere, right? Despite Krause’s writing being quick and clever, exactly what I love, I wasn’t enamored with the beginning. But hold on. Don’t put this one down.  I plodded on and ended up loving it!

Skip factor:  0% I skipped nothing. Krause’s short, crisp writing, with lots of dialogue, kept me from skipping anything at all.

Who should read:  For the first time in a review, I’m not sure who to suggest should read this novel. My guess is, if you like frivolous, quirky characters, good writing, and different plots, you’ll like this. That’s as good as my guess gets today.

Summary:  This is the story of three very different women and their nerdy landlord. Upfront, there appear to be ghosts in the attic of the three-unit old-home-converted-to-apartment building they share. Each of the women, along with Landlord Larry, have a past dilemma haunting them (ha-ha) that they must come to terms with.

Nineteen-year-old Mackenzie can’t forgive herself for a lie she told at thirteen. Middle-aged Sunna, a beauty, can’t forgive a friend—and not just any friend but a more-beautiful, went-on-to-a-bigger-brighter-career friend—for ghosting her. And the totally friendless senior character, Maude, can’t get along with anyone because some man, Richard, left her at the alter—or rather, in the park in a wedding gown.

When a note in the mailbox, “Sorry I missed You” is found all but ripped to shreds, the three attempt to decipher who it was meant for. The only message they can decrypt, however, is someone will meet someone at a local coffee shop on some afternoon. Because of their haunting pasts, each of the women believe the letter was meant for them, and they begin meeting at the coffee shop every day, which results in a rather forced friendship. Then, when the building they live in presents ghosts of its own—real ghosts—they begin to rely heavily on each other.

Without a spoiler, the plot is silly, but by the time a reader realizes this, they’ve got too much invested in these women. By halfway through the book I couldn’t put it down because I LOVED all three of them along with landlord Larry.

Characters:  Krause’s characters are so different you’ll thrive on their interactions. I am honestly unsure which character I liked the most. Very seldom do I begin a book not liking any characters and end up loving all of them, equally. In fact. This is a first, so here are the characters in no particular order:

Sunna is a beauty but has been stifled by her ex-friend Britt, a bigger beauty. Sunna has no patience, is curt, and when she becomes acquainted with the older lady in her apartment building, Maude, she realizes she is on a path to become alone and friendless like Maude.

Mackenzie is the youngest and nicest tenant, who at times you believe might be a murderer. Yet you love her anyway for her compassion.

Maude is the old lady you love to hate. Bitter, annoyed, whiny, and honest to a fault, you can’t help but wish you had a little bit of her bluntness.

Landlord Larry is a forty-year-old punker who practically has nerd tattooed on his forehead. His thoughts are so entertaining that they add humor to his already peculiar, humorous life.

Minor characters – Not many. Richard, Maude’s ex, shows up but the reader judges him purely from Maude, Sunna and Mackenzie’s thrashing of him. A few other characters pop in for a line or two, but Krause keeps out the unimportant.

Storyline:  Strange, weird, silly, yet believe it or not, insightful. There are a few questions I have about the plots for Mackenzie and Sunna. (I’m going back and reread to make sure I didn’t miss because often I do.) And, not to ruin the tale, the way Krause winds up the ghosts in the attic is a tad farfetched even for me—an occasional paranormal writer. Yet, I couldn’t help but love the story. Everything is so cleverly written you can’t put it down. Again, I’ve never gone from not caring for characters to loving them. (I have to figure out how Krause did this!) The writing of the storyline was superb, and I enjoyed the wrap up of their internal struggles.

Writing:  In Sorry I Missed You, Krause masters writing style, technique, word usage, and character development.

Like most novels, the story begins slow. For writers, beginnings are tough. You juggle the boredom of the backstory with opening sensationalism. Recently lambasted on Amazon about the beginning of one of my own novels, I’ve done some front-end soul-searching lately. Did I love the beginning of my own book? No. I didn’t blame my reviewer. My first chapter was okay. Second and third, eh. Fourth, I didn’t like. Then from five on out, I was pretty proud.

Sorry I Missed You re-sparked a flicker of confidence in me. I realized beginnings are tough for most writers—even fabulous ones like Krause.

I walked through her first chapters. However, by forty percent in, I was back in my happy place, speeding along. Comfortably curled up on the couch wondering how much reading I could get in before I started feeling guilty about my real-world chores.

If you love great writing and characters, you’ll love this like me.

Read this author again? Yes. I loved Krause’s writing. I’m not a fan of wordy, and Krause isn’t. She writes clean and crisp. Her character development is as good as any writer’s, better than most. I’m anxious to read her again.  

Read on!

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CJ Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene, a psychological thriller, Dream Wide Awake, and Project Dream, two thrillers that carry a sixth-sense paranormal element, and Friends Who Move Couches, women’s fiction. These last two novels were inspired by Zahner’s own experiences. See the video of her own paranormal experience, a premonition of 9/11 here. Download her Beyond Reality Radio podcast here. Follow her on InstagramTwitterFacebookGoodreads, BookBub, or LinkedIn. Purchase her books on Amazon.

 

 

The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

Rating:  4

General Rating:  Kidd amalgamates narrative and dialogue to perfection in this  touching tale of a motherless girl who runs away from an abusive father.

Skip factor:  1% I skipped little. The writing was just too good.

Who should read: All women, all ages.

Summary:  This is the story of Lily Owens who must come to terms with the death of her mother. Lily, abandoned by her mother for a short time before she died, remembers the day her mother returned—the same day her mother was shot and killed. Now Lily is a teenager, feeling confused and unloved. Raised by an abusive father, she finds some affection in Rosaleen, the African American woman whom her father hired shortly after her mother’s death. When Rosaleen attempts to register to vote, she finds trouble with white men and she and Lily end up in jail. Lily’s father, T. Ray, bails Lily out, but she returns and helps Rosaleen escape.

They flee to a town called Tiburon because one of the few items Lily had from her mother was a picture of a Black Madonna. Tiburon, South Carolina was inscribed on the back. Lily asks around Tiburon about the picture and ends up at the house of three African American sisters—the very house her mother had run to when she first left T. Ray and abandoned Lily. The story is of Lily’s time spent there and her journey to come to terms with her mother’s abandonment and death, and her feeling of being unworthy of love.

Characters:  I loved this book partially because of the strong female characters Kidd created. They are flawed but loving and strong. I like every single one, loved a few.

Here they are in the order I liked them:

August – The strongest of the African American sisters, August has a deep understanding of life. She is a beekeeper and teaches Lily the craft of collecting honey from bees. August knew Lily’s mother, but she understands when and how to relay pieces of information to the girl. She is an old soul, and I came away wishing I had an August in my own life.

Lily – Kudos to the author in the creation of Lily. It took some time for me to like Lily. Raised by T. Ray, who never showed her affection or love, she herself was lacking in these elements. She had a flat personality that slowly came out through the novel, making the story real to me.

Rosaleen – Lily’s caregiver was also a hard character to figure out, although I liked her gumption right away. She’s enamored by the thought of registering to vote, and spits at prejudiced white men who insult her with no regard for what they would do to her. She’s tough. But because of that toughness, Lily often wonders if Rosaleen loves her.

May – Another of the three sisters is May, who brightened the story with her unique personality. Her twin sister died years before and left her in a nervous state. To calm her anxiety, her sisters encouraged her to write her fears/anxieties down and in doing so, they created a wailing wall for her made of stone. Every time May had an episode, she led was led off to leave a note in her wall.

June – The third sister, June, does not initially get along with Lily. She also has a beau who keeps proposing to her despite she constantly turns him down. June has a journey to make on her own. I enjoyed this character, too—another strong woman.

Minor characters – Kidd successfully had me liking minor characters (like Zach) and hating the bigots.

Storyline:  This is not a fast-paced, page-turning novel. It is contemplative—simple language with deep meaning. The story flows, and I found myself looking forward to reading more.

Writing:  Lots of white space makes me happy and this book, while having much narrative, never labored on. Paragraphs were short, clean, and interesting, so I never realized when there wasn’t dialogue for several pages. She writes simply and profoundly throughout. Like this: “I filled a bowl with Rice Krispies and milk, trying to think over the snap-crackle conversation it was having with itself.” And “…people can start out one way, and by the time life gets through with them they end up completely different.”

Read this author again? Absolutely.  

Read on!

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CJ Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene, a psychological thriller, Dream Wide Awake, and Project Dream, two thrillers that carry a sixth-sense paranormal element, and Friends Who Move Couches, women’s fiction. These last two novels were inspired by Zahner’s own experiences. See the video of her own paranormal experience, a premonition of 9/11 here. Download her Beyond Reality Radio podcast here. Follow her on InstagramTwitter, Facebook, Goodreads, BookBub, or LinkedIn. Purchase her books on Amazon.

 

A Simple Mask of Stanchless Avarice

Just when we think we’ve seen everything, out comes Wabtec to teach us we haven’t.

Regardless of which side of the fence you sit on, the economy-over-people open-the-country side or the people-over-economy keep-it-closed side, I think we can all agree on one point: masks help slow the spread of this nasty and often fatal virus.

Surprisingly, in a country bombarded with rules and regulations, our surgeon general and NIAID director failed us. But we shouldn’t point blame at them. They had no idea how low surviving rust-belt-city companies could bend their backs to get under that net-profits limbo pole. If they had known, surely they would have added a regulation: do more than cut holes in sheets to protect your employees.

Think this mask is a joke? You’re wrong. Pictured above is an actual mask passed out to an employee. Ridiculous? Yes. Appalling? Yes. Surprising? No. Nothing big companies do to meet regulations and maintain profits surprises me anymore.

I truly believe the best, most protective masks should land in the hands of the medical professionals, health-care workers, and first responders who come in direct contact with COVID-19 patients. Yet, any worker deserves more than two holes cut in a sheet.

I don’t know the details. I’m not sure who issued the masks, or where the Local 506 Union stands on them. I do not know how hard it is to obtain masks for employees. I just know I had to say something—for those who can’t.

I no longer live in Erie, my husband retired, and we’ve moved to be by our daughter. One of my proudest memories of Erie will always include how resilient families—my own included—weathered through the decline of the rust-belt years. Hard-working men and women who simply wanted a decent wage. My biggest disappointment was how, when the chips were down, many residents—even hard-nosed democrats and blue-collar comrades—criticized the GE/Wabtec workers. I’m still shocked. That some middle-class residents took the side of corporate leaders earning tremendous bonuses over their neighbors, stunned me.

Now this. An embarrassing, degrading mask to workers who deserve so much more.  If I sewed, I’d make a batch of masks for Erie shift workers, mark them up with something like “people matter” or “proud blue.”

Hang in there. Stay safe. Get yourself a good mask. This too shall pass.

With the utmost respect and prayers,

Cyndie Zahner

 

#masksmatter

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The Truth About Forever

Name:                               The Truth About Forever

Author:                              Sarah Dessen

Rating:                              5

General Rating:               A perfectly sweet book to make you forget the pandemic. This novel will make you smile. It ranks as one of my favorite YA books.

Skip factor:        >1% I barely skipped anything. A few times I was so engrossed in the story I speed-read through several paragraphs to find out what would happen. I couldn’t wait to see what was around the bend.

Who should read:           Women, young and old. This is clean and appropriate for any age. Young girls will identify with the main character, and older women will fondly remember days past.

Summary:          No spoilers. This is the story of a high school girl, Macy, whose perfect suburban world is suddenly tainted by the death of her father. She is the youngest of two children and while her older sister is a bit wild and outspoken, Macy is quiet, smart, and sensible. She was close to her dad and after his death, she folds inside herself and tries to become the perfect daughter for her mother. She has a relationship with an intelligent boy, who is driven by his life’s career goals. When he goes away for the summer to “brain camp,” Macy’s mother hires a catering service for an event, and Macy becomes enamored by the owner, Delia, and her employees. She begins working for Delia and hanging around with some of the workers, in particular, a boy named Wes. Macy’s mother believes this is the “wrong” crowd for Macy. But is it? This is a lovely story about life and growing up.

Characters:        Dessen creates simple characters, some who immediately win you over, and some who take the normal route of progression and capture your heart over time. I loved most—actually—all of them. Helplessly. I was a quarter through the book before I realized certain characters brought a smile to my face every time they walked onto a page.

Here they are in the order I liked them:

Kristy – My favorite character had a scar on her face that never inhibited her. The personality Dessen creates in Kristy is clever and vivacious. She has an extraordinary attitude and is witty. Her take on life will make you smile.

Wes– He’s cute and doesn’t know it, a talented artist and doesn’t flaunt it, and he is unimpressed with the scads of girls who “swoon” over him. Unrealistic, I know. But despite his impeccably perfect personality that seems unlikely, his simple nature has you loving him almost the moment he appears. Dessen is that good.

Macy – Macy is the type of character you want to pull out of the book and wrap your arms around. She is quiet, kind, and never speaks her mind. She is painstakingly shy, even afraid to show anger toward her mother. I routed for her from the beginning.

Minor characters – I liked the minor characters more in this book than any other novel I’ve read.

Delia – Delia is my favorite minor character. She owns the catering business. An old soul with a good grasp on life, Delia lacks the organizing skills of a normal business owner. Still, somehow, things always work out for Delia in the end. She is positivity, kindness, and chaos wrapped in one. If her charm doesn’t make you love her, her pregnancy will. She’s the perfect minor character who jumps in, flaws and all, with a perfect splash.

Caroline – Macy’s sister flits in and out. Macy mentions her “sneaking out” as a teenager so the reader gets the impression, she is a bit wild. For me, I wasn’t sure about her at first, but when she reappeared later in the book, I loved her. You see Caroline from Macy’s perspective only, which is how it should be. However pulling this off is sometimes hard for an author. Not Dessen. Caroline is one character (as is the mother) whom I learned to love over time.

Monica – This is the sister of my favorite character, Kristy. So how could Dessen make her stand out when Kristy has such a magnanimous personality? Dessen made her painfully laid back—the total opposite of Kristy. People could barely get more than an uh-huh or umm from her. It worked. I loved Monaco, too. When she finally spoke, I felt like applauding.

Bert – Brother of Wes is a nerd. He has a silly little game that he plays with his older brother, is forever awkward, and is enamored by some Sci-fi group waiting for the world to end. He adds flavor to the story. You’ll be saying, “oh boy, here he comes.”  AND. He makes you like his big brother, Wes, even more for putting up with and loving him.

The mother – You see Macy’s Mom through Macy’s eyes. She, too, evolves throughout the book, adding an unusual, almost silent, side-story to the coming-of-age plot. The woman has lost her husband and Macy doesn’t quite understand her. The mother doesn’t understand herself. She progresses in the background until she finds her own truth.

Storyline:            There are no slow parts. This story flows, page after page, flawlessly. Even the middle, which I usually struggle with, kept my attention. This is an old story dressed up by unique minor characters. Not my usual genre, but I loved.

Writing:              Dessen’s writing is superb. Not much else to say. Her plot and characters keep your attention. This is the first novel I’ve read by this author and honestly, I googled her to find out where she went to school. How she learned to write so well.

Read this author again? Yes. Three-fourths of the way through this book, I realized I would be done soon, panicked, and took out another Dessen book from my library online. I can’t afford to buy them all!

Read on!

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CJ Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene, a psychological thriller, Dream Wide Awake and Project Dream, two thrillers that carry a sixth-sense paranormal element, and Friends Who Move Couches, women’s fiction. These last two novels were inspired by Zahner’s own experiences. See the video of her own paranormal experience, a premonition of 9/11 here. Download her Beyond Reality Radio podcast here. Follow her on InstagramTwitterFacebookGoodreadsBookBub, or LinkedIn. Purchase her books on Amazon.

 

The Silent Patient

Name:                               The Silent Patient

Author:                              Alex Michaelides

Rating:                              4

General Rating:      This is totally my type of book, what I call an in-your-head novel. I dislike books with long, drawn-out descriptions. This story is to the point. Has much dialogue. And is an easy read while hiding a complicated plot.

Skip factor:     0% This is one of those few books where I did not skip a word.

Who should read:         People who do not like descriptions of settings, people’s looks, or places. This is an in-the-head book. The plot consumes you.

Summary:          No spoilers. This is the story of a psychotherapist who believes his wife is cheating on him. He begins a new job and immediately throws himself into helping a single client whose case he is familiar with. So not to spoil it, I’ll say there is a murder and throughout the entire book, you will ask yourself who really killed the person? Is it this character? Or this one? Who’s crazy?

Characters:        Despite the depth Michaelides creates for each character, you do not have to go back and reread sections to clarify traits. This varies from most thrillers I’ve read where I am saying What? And then thumbing back through pages or zipping through screen after screen to find what I am remembering that has confused me. I’m not sure how the author did this, but I always felt the next clue would be in a future chapter, never in a past one.

Having said that, this is another book where I did not feel connected to any character. Another novel where I was concentrating so greatly on the plot, the character’s personalities were clues only. I never asked myself if I liked any of them until I had nearly finished the novel. The way this author writes is that good.

Here are the characters I remember:

Alicia – If I came close to liking a character, it was Alicia, the accused murderess. I rode the roller coaster of she-did-it-she-didn’t up and down and throughout. The element of surprise from this, the silent patient, character intrigued me. She kept me guessing.

Theo– The psychotherapist. This is to the author’s credit: I was about three-fourths through the book before I realized I had no attachment to him. I asked myself why. He’s believable as a psychotherapist. Think of how you read a document written by a doctor or how you listen to a doctor give a diagnosis. You listen to their words. You’re hanging onto their diagnosis, suggestions, or whatever they are relaying. Their words are important, not them. It never occurs to you that this is a person with a life, family. Theo was that believable. Throughout most of the book, I thought only of what he was saying. Additionally, he was believable. I imagine the author did much research on psychotherapy. I actually expected him to have a psychology background.

Minor characters – People came in out. Kathy, Theo’s wife; Yuri, a co-worker; Max, the adopted brother of the victim entered and exited scenes perfectly. While I neither liked nor disliked them, I studied everyone. Each character held a connection to the storyline. They were necessary.

Storyline:            There are slow parts in the middle like every book. I’ve heard some reader’s criticisms, and a few times, I thought I might end up rating this a 3 or 3.5 at best. That feeling did not last long. In all, I found the story magnificently plotted and the lives intricately pieced together. This is my type of puzzle. Towards the end, I couldn’t put down.

Writing:              Not sure how to evaluate the writing. Again, this is my style. I hate long paragraphs that describe settings. I am more a “people” person, always wondering what is going on inside someone’s head. If you are the sort who remembers what someone was wearing, their eye color, or the smell of their perfume, you may not like this as much as I did. If you are like me, always asking What did they mean by that statement? Why was this character introduced? I believe you’ll enjoy this one immensely.

And if you like strong dialogue? You’ll love. Nature lovers, interior decorators, people who like physical detail? Not as much.

Read this author again? OMG absolutely.

Read on!

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CJ Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene, a psychological thriller, Dream Wide Awake and Project Dream, two thrillers that carry a sixth-sense paranormal element, and Friends Who Move Couches, women’s fiction. These last two novels were inspired by Zahner’s own experiences. See the video of her own paranormal experience, a premonition of 9/11 here. Download her Beyond Reality Radio podcast here. Follow her on InstagramTwitterFacebookGoodreadsBookBubor LinkedIn. Purchase her books on Amazon.

To Mom, With Love

Dear Mom,

We had some great times in our little family, didn’t we?

I stayed right beside you while Jessie, Zak, and Jilly grew up and moved away. I nuzzled Furgy back yardnext to your feet after you retired and sat alone writing. I ran with you. (Remember those days?) We spent time together on warm summer mornings on the Peninsula when Dad went to work. (Remember the turtles?) You snuck me lots of treats when Zak and Dad weren’t around. (The doctor said I was fat.) We hiked through tons of forests. (I got ticks but it was worth it!) We welcomed Layla into our family. (Isn’t she just perfect?) And Bandit, Peanut, and Peaches. (I love them, too!) We traveled to lots of states and cities! Visited tons of parks! Swam in lakes and creeks. Played catch. Rolled in grass and sand and snow!

In the past few months, I traveled back and forth to Raleigh with you and helped make moving away from the house you raised your children in and your great friends easier.

I know you love me, Mom, but it’s time. I’m tired. I don’t think you will ever stop loving me, but this is the best time for me to leave you. You are in a nice new place by Jilly now. (Maybe Zak will move there and you can catch a plane to see Jessie and Layla within fifteen minutes.) I don’t want to cloud your new home up with lots of memories of me to make you sad. So I’m going home. It’s best for you if I leave now.

Plus, I want to be with Molly. Play tug of war with her again. Have my legs back. My wild fuzzy hair, strong lungs. I want to roll in heaven’s thick grass and see her colors. Run in her warm snow!!

Be strong for Jessie, Zak, Jilly, and Dad, Mom. furgy and family2They are going to miss me. Sorry about waiting until you were on the plane to get sick, but it was best if you and dad were with Jessie and Layla and I was with Jilly and Zak. Didn’t all three of them know just what to do? I’m so proud of them.

Love you, Mom. Bye for now. See you later.  I know I will live in your heart forever.

All my love,
Furgy

 

Dear Furgy,

Even in death you thought only of me. No dog ever loved as much as you. I love, love, love, love you right back. No human ever loved a dog more.

Run free, my sweet girl, run free.

All my love,
Mom

Furgy 1

 

_____________________________________                          CJ Zahner is a wife, mother, author, and a girl who loved a dog with all her heart.

To My Husband

If you see Jeff Zahner today wish him happy retirement!

Jeff is going on an adventure.

That’s how we do things in our family. Our oldest daughter, Jessie, inspired this family moto. “What adventure shall we tackle today, Layla?” she asks her two-year-old just about every morning.

And that’s exactly how Jeff is looking at his future. He’s gathered up books he wants to read, Marx toys he wants to organize, and journals he wants to reminisce over. He’s made notes of places he would like to visit, sorted through boxes of sports paraphernalia, sold his journeyman’s tools, and emptied his prized shed.

He’s free.

For over forty years, Jeff worked full time and provided a wonderful life for me and our children. Twenty-five of those years (at a minimum), he worked consistent 60+ hour weeks.

I know, lots of people work overtime. But the one thing that sets Jeff apart is in the over-forty years of rising early and working long days and weekends, he never once complained.

Not one single time.

I’ll never understand that in him–his ability to accept the hand life deals you so easily, happily.

I have been blessed to be married to Jeff for over thirty-eight years. I asked him the other day if he minded always being my shoulder and never having me be his shoulder because that’s the way it is in our marriage. Me worrying. Him coddling.

He thought for a moment and then said, quite sincerely, “Actually, no. I like being the shoulder.”

That’s Jeff. Content, happy—accepting life just as it is. That is a quality many people never choose. (Me included!)

I think my children will agree, Jeff has been a great role model. All three inherited his courage and work ethic. Jessie ventured away after high school to earn an undergrad and graduate degree in psychology, then worked in the professional sports arena for years until taking on her most important job, raising our granddaughter! Zak said goodbye to Erie for good after law school, and Jilly, at age twenty-six, packed up her car, moved all by herself to Raleigh, North Carolina, and today holds two jobs and is working toward her doctorate!

Now it’s Jeff’s turn, and I am blessed to be a part of his next adventure. We will spend the next few years partially in Erie and partially in Raleigh. We will also visit our daughter and granddaughter in California, our son in Philly, and travel as often as we can/want!

There will be good times and bad times ahead. (But how lucky am I to always have that firm shoulder to lean on?) Our adventures may lead us to many places. Some we will love and others, not so much. But that’s what makes life exciting, isn’t it? The adventure? And there isn’t anyone else in the world I would rather go on an adventure with other than my husband.

I love you, Jeff. Thanks for working so hard all these years and providing a great life for me and the kids.  Thanks for always being a firm shoulder for me to rest my weary head on. And most of all, thank you for loving me. Marrying you was the absolute best adventure I took in my life. If our next adventures are half as good as that, what a great retirement you (we) will have.

jillys fence(Ps. Jilly texted. Don’t sell all your tools. When you get to Raleigh you have to fix her fence.)

 

 

____________________________________________
CJ Zahner retired from her full-time job at 58 years old when her supportive husband, Jeff, said, “Quit your job. You’re a writer.”

She is now the author of The Suicide Gene, a psychological thriller, and Dream Wide Awake and Project Dream, two thrillers that carry a paranormal element. These last two novels were inspired by Zahner’s own experiences. See the video of her paranormal experience, a premonition of 9/11 here. Download her Beyond Reality Radio podcast here. Follow her on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, BookBub, or LinkedIn. Purchase her books on Amazon. And watch for her soon to be released novel, Friends Who Move Couches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Help a Small-time Author Hit 50 Reviews!

This is meant to EASILY instruct readers on reviewing novels on Amazon and Goodreads.

I am a small-time author who can’t win Amazon’s respect until I reach 50 reviews. Many people purchase my novels, but few review them. If you’ve read but not reviewed my novels, please consider helping me to 50! Here’s how:

On Amazon, if you purchased the book, you may post a VERIFIED review. Amazon sometimes removes reviews but almost never removes verified reviews.

If you purchased the book/ebook, post a verified review by:

  • Opening your account and selecting:
    1. My Orders
    2. Digital Orders (Orders if paperback)
    3. Write a product review –  write one & hit SUBMIT

REVIEWS _ AMAZON1    REVIEWS - AMAZON2 REVIEWS - AMAZON3

If you didn’t purchase on Amazon, you can still post a non-verified review:

  • Go to http://bit.ly/CJ_Zahner or type CJ Zahner in search box
  • Click the book cover
  • Scroll to Customer reviews & stars (watch left side of screen) (see pic below)
  • Select:
      1. Review this product
      2. Write a customer review – write one & hit SUBMIT.

REVIEWS - AMAZON 1A REVIEWS - AMAZON2A & scroll to REVIEW - AMAZON 3A

On Goodreads, you must create an account, but it’s great. You may track all the books you read. Post a review:

  • Go to http://bit.ly/CZgoodreads or enter CJ Zahner in search
  • Click the book cover
  • Click dropdown box (arrow) under book cover on left
  • Select read (if read doesn’t appear click currently reading)
  • Write review, select stars, titles
  • Scroll to the bottom of the screen and hit POST

REVIEWS - GOODREADS1 REVIEWS - GOODREADS2 REVIEWS - GOODREADS3

 THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!

 For those of you completely enamored by the process, feel free to review my novels on BookBub, It’s the simplest once you create your account:

  • Enter book title in search box,
  • Click on book cover
  • Click review
  • Select stars/recommendations/write a review
  • Click share

NOTE: To Anyone who has reviewed all three of my novels, please contact me at cyndie.zahner@gmail.com with the subject line CJ ZAHNER REVIEWER. I will send you a free ebook of my new novel, Friends Who Move Couches, in May!

____________________________________________
CJ Zahner is the author of The Suicide Gene, a psychological thriller, and Dream Wide Awake and Project Dream, two thrillers that carry a paranormal element. These last two novels were inspired by Zahner’s own experiences. See the video of her paranormal experience, a premonition of 9/11 here. Download her Beyond Reality Radio podcast here. Follow her on InstagramTwitterFacebook, Goodreads, BookBub, or LinkedIn. Purchase her books on Amazon. And watch for her soon to be released novel, Friends Who Move Couches.